Slow-Release Carbs

Slowly Digestible Starch (SDS) is a slow-release carbohydrate.

SDS in Nature

SDS is found naturally in uncooked grains, legumes, roots, and tubers.

Preserving SDS

SDS preservation is dependent on both the nature of the ingredients and food processing conditions, such as heat, pressure, and moisture.

Breakdown of SDS

SDS takes longer to break down because its structure is less accessible to digestive enzymes.

Steady Release of Glucose

Higher SDS content in food results in a slow and steady release of glucose from the intestine into the blood, which helps moderate glycemic and insulinemic responses.

Slow-Release Carbs

Slowly Digestible Starch (SDS) is a slow-release carbohydrate.

SDS in Nature

SDS is found naturally in uncooked grains, legumes, roots, and tubers.

Preserving SDS

SDS preservation is dependent on both the nature of the ingredients and food processing conditions, such as heat, pressure, and moisture.

Breakdown of SDS

SDS takes longer to break down because its structure is less accessible to digestive enzymes.

Steady Release of Glucose

Higher SDS content in food results in a slow and steady release of glucose from the intestine into the blood, which helps moderate glycemic and insulinemic responses.

What is Slowly Digestible Starch (SDS)?

Slowly digestible starch is a slow-release carbohydrate that occurs naturally in starchy foods such as grains, legumes, roots and tubers. Its preservation is dependent on both the nature of the ingredients and food processing conditions, such as heat, pressure, and moisture. Slowly digestible starch takes longer to break down by digestive enzymes because its structure is less accessible to their action. Consumption of foods with high SDS content results in a moderate and steady release of glucose from the intestine into the blood. This leads to lower post-meal blood glucose and insulin responses compared to starchy foods with low SDS content.